Starting Somewhere, Sharing Everywhere.

Essential Skill 1:  Reading Text  


Reading sentences or paragraphs. For example: notes, letters, emails, magazines, manuals, regulations, books, reports, product labels, legal agreements. Includes words on paper and words on a screen.


Essential Skill 2:  Document Use
                           
 


Understanding visual images such as graphs, lists, tables, drawings, symbols, signs, maps, labels, forms, x-rays. The visual display or arrangement gives meaning to the content.


Essential Skill 3:  Numeracy  


Using numbers and being able to think in terms of “amounts”. For example: Money math, Scheduling or budgeting/accounting, Measurement/calculation, Data analysis, and Estimation may require solving problems by using numbers.


Essential Skill 4:  Writing   


Writing words to share ideas. For example: Writing notes, emails, letters, reports, orders, logbook entries, text messages. Includes “pen and paper” writing and keyboarding.


Essential Skill 5:  Oral Communication
                           
 


Speaking and listening to share thoughts or information. For example: greeting, telling stories, giving advice, sharing ideas, facilitating, coordinating tasks, explaining, discussing. Can be face-to-face, or using technology.


Essential Skill 6:  Working With Others
                             
  


Interacting with family, friends, community members, students and co-workers to accomplish tasks together.

Essential Skill 7:  Thinking Skills
                           
 


Using your brain to: Solve problems, Make decisions, Think critically, Plan and organize tasks, Remember and Find information


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Essential Skill 8:  Digital Technology
                           
  


Using technology. For example: computers, cell phones, GPs, digital cameras, iPods, and MP3s, gaming devices, computerized cash registers, Blackberries, iPhones. Includes using the Internet and email.


Essential Skill 9:  Continuous Learning
                           
 


Gaining skills and knowledge throughout life. Includes: Learning how to learn, Understanding your learning style, Knowing how to find resources and learning opportunities.


go2HR Tourism Budgeting for Training

With the thought of taking from your operating budget to spend on staff training initiatives, it’s understandable if you consider employee development an expense. Yet because the benefits of training are so numerous, it’s much more beneficial to consider training as an investment in human resources.

The right staff training program can increase employee engagement, retention, productivity, decrease the need for supervision, reduce absenteeism, improve customer service, lower the number of complaints, and boost sales. Well-informed employees make fewer mistakes and are more effective in dealing with your customers. And because employees will feel valued and appreciated, training can also increase the commitment and personal confidence that your staff feel in their jobs. This helps to create an appealing work environment and will help minimize staff turnover. If you choose your training wisely, it’s clear your dollars will be well-spent.

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