Starting Somewhere, Sharing Everywhere.

Essential Skill 1:  Reading Text  


Reading sentences or paragraphs. For example: notes, letters, emails, magazines, manuals, regulations, books, reports, product labels, legal agreements. Includes words on paper and words on a screen.


Essential Skill 2:  Document Use
                           
 


Understanding visual images such as graphs, lists, tables, drawings, symbols, signs, maps, labels, forms, x-rays. The visual display or arrangement gives meaning to the content.


Essential Skill 3:  Numeracy  


Using numbers and being able to think in terms of “amounts”. For example: Money math, Scheduling or budgeting/accounting, Measurement/calculation, Data analysis, and Estimation may require solving problems by using numbers.


Essential Skill 4:  Writing   


Writing words to share ideas. For example: Writing notes, emails, letters, reports, orders, logbook entries, text messages. Includes “pen and paper” writing and keyboarding.


Essential Skill 5:  Oral Communication
                           
 


Speaking and listening to share thoughts or information. For example: greeting, telling stories, giving advice, sharing ideas, facilitating, coordinating tasks, explaining, discussing. Can be face-to-face, or using technology.


Essential Skill 6:  Working With Others
                             
  


Interacting with family, friends, community members, students and co-workers to accomplish tasks together.

Essential Skill 7:  Thinking Skills
                           
 


Using your brain to: Solve problems, Make decisions, Think critically, Plan and organize tasks, Remember and Find information


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Essential Skill 8:  Digital Technology
                           
  


Using technology. For example: computers, cell phones, GPs, digital cameras, iPods, and MP3s, gaming devices, computerized cash registers, Blackberries, iPhones. Includes using the Internet and email.


Essential Skill 9:  Continuous Learning
                           
 


Gaining skills and knowledge throughout life. Includes: Learning how to learn, Understanding your learning style, Knowing how to find resources and learning opportunities.


Navigating Computer Career Pathways in 2020: What Advisors Need to Know

Wednesday, June 12, 2020, through ceric.ca/webinars.

Overview

Responding to a strong demand for computing graduates in Canada and a changing technology landscape, Randy Connolly, Janet Miller and Faith-Michael Uzoka of Mount Royal University, have released the second edition of the CERIC guide Computing Careers & Disciplines: A Quick Guide for Prospective Students and Career Advisors. This 2nd edition is developed to meet an evolving need among career advisors who support students interested in technology at both the secondary and post-secondary levels and aims to address the questions of why student should consider computing when choosing a career, and what kind of education and career pathways they can expect when they do.

Why You Should Attend

This free webinar will provide you with an overview of the new guide and of the main computing disciplines as defined by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) as well as emerging specializations. I will help parents, academic advisors and career counsellors in supporting students to make sense of the maze of computing disciplines and post-secondary options.

Register for Webinar Here